It was a great party, until…

No doubt connecting with people on social media is an essential small business marketing strategy. It’s free and can reach lots of people.

Now, imagine a room full of people enjoying themselves while standing around and visiting in small groups. Suddenly, a new person loudly enters the area—interrupting the groups, taking over conversations, and challenging people to buy their new product.

Wait! Let’s replay that scene.

This time, imagine a room full of people enjoying themselves, standing around and visiting in small groups. Now imagine a new person quietly entering the room, looking around at the groups and sense which one to join. The visitor approaches the edge of the group listening and observing. They appear to empathize with the existing conversation through their body language and facial participation. Eventually, someone in the group notices them and invites them to participate. The new person contributes a pertinent comment and earns some trust; this leads to further participation opportunities.

Some say the second scenario is more akin to healthy social media marketing. What do you think? Please leave your comment below or click replay to write me directly and confidentially, if you prefer. I’d love to hear from you either way.

Best re-Arghs,
Cap’n John

John Parker,
Professional Development Adventure Guide
Merced, California

P.S. I teach Digital Marketing Boot Camp for SkillPath Seminars—a fun adventure!


7 Comments

  1. Good analogy John. For our 10 year class reunion they put together a booklet with candid shots of everyone and names, addresses and phone numbers so we could keep in touch. One of the guys used that list to contact everyone about his Amway-type business. He lost friends over that abuse. Networking may be a good thing if you love your business more than your friends. Bringing it up in person as a part of the conversation is more honey and less vinegar. I wonder if he will be showing up for our 50 year reunion? Hopefully he is long retired by now. Aaarrrg

    • Great story, Melody.

      B. J. Thomas sang something like:
      I used to love things and use people now I’ve learned to use things and love people.

      The party story really makes me think about listening better.

      I’ll remain curious about Amway man until after your reunion. Please be sure and let me know whether he makes it or not.

      John

    • B. J. Thomas sang something like:
      I used to love things and use people now I’ve learned to use things and love people.

      The party story really makes me think about listening better.

      I’ll remain curious about Amway man until after your reunion. Please be sure and let me know whether he makes it or not.

      John

  2. I wish more people would behave this way on social media, making real connections. It seems, all too often, that when I am being thoughtful and reasoned in my responses, I am completely run over by the bulls in the social media china shop.

    • John Parker

      “Bulls in the social media china shop.” What a great analogy, Lorena. Thank you!

      Signs on the site walls could read: No running. No dish-breaking. Lots of listening. You break it you buy it.

      St.Paul writes:

      ~”Let your kindness be known to all.” And you, “…must not be argumentative, but a gentle listener and a teacher who keeps cool…”

  3. People who advertise without connecting to the group are just another version of spamming. Many Facebook groups forbid it and will oust anyone who practices this.

    But what if someone knows of a problem many of them have and want to offer a solution? If this person accurately states the problem, other identify with it, and this person offers empathy and a solution, would that be selling? Zig Zigler would say, “Stop selling and start helping people.” Would that be okay?

    • John Parker

      Yes, Rob!

      Even in our families we may be “Selling” and not “Helping.” Zig’s admonition works everywhere!

      I’m going to ask the Sealeggers Crew your “…would that be selling?” question. It’s a great one!

      Thank you, Rob! Mighty Oregonian Arghs to you!
      Cap’n John